Much has been written about online marketing, whether it is search engine marketing, content marketing, PPC,  social media or viral videos. Much of it is also written about on-site factors — design, usability, conversion optimisation and so on. But, maybe more should be written about the journey that a user must make from the marketing channel they interact with to the final destination: the conversion page on the website. This journey must be as seamless as possible, lubricated with carefully strategised copy and design. The more seamless the journey, the higher the conversion rates. Step 1: The Arena Marketing materials have to exist somewhere. When online, they must exist, for example, on a search engine results page, on a Google ad, on Face book and Twitter, or in a viral video. Every arena has different qualities, and the people in the arenas are in different frames of mind. A person using a search engine is actively looking for something specific and searches using specific key words. Someone viewing a viral video or slide share is in recreational mode, expecting to be amused, and happy to flit from site-to-site. Advertising needs to fit well with the arena it is being displayed in. The act of viewing and absorbing a certain marketing message must be seamless for users in any given arena. Step 2: The Marketing Message Why does a specific bit of online marketing appeal to someone? In the first place it grabs attention somehow. It might be the use of copy, colour, or animation, but it has to make someone focus on it at the expense of all the other things going on in the web browser. Once the attention is grabbed, the marketing message is delivered. The message is usually a promise. It might not be explicit, but at least implicitly, marketing of all kinds promises the viewer something – a product, a price, a service – some specific result that will now be expected. . You need to be absolutely clear about what you are promising, because if your message is compelling enough then next up comes… Step 3: The Click It really often is one click from marketing message to website (e.g. in the case of Search Engine Marketing), but of course sometimes there is a slightly longer process. With social media and viral strategies the marketing message is usually contained in another website or service, such as Twitter, Facebook or YouTube. Your potential customer might need to browse around a Facebook fan page a little before following a link to your website, or navigate from Tweet to Tweet, honing in on one of your URLs. This is perhaps the most important step as far as...